Forever Young


SOME PEOPLE ARE LUCKY ENOUGH TO HAVE INHERITED NATURAL ANTIAGEING GENES. THE REST OF US HAVE TO WORK AT IT. DANIELA ALLEN FINDS OUT HOW.

Article as appeared on A&H Magazine 24th April 2014

I am always intrigued by those who look young despite their age. I particularly remember one university lecturer who stood out for his joie de vivre, youthfulness and positive outlook on life, even though he was approaching retirement age at the time. He was dedicated, content and rarely seen in a foul mood. He was young at heart, didn’t focus much on aesthetics but was evidently fit and healthy. As we wondered how he kept this up, he explained “Young people make me feel young. Youth generates youthfulness”. He said he was a firm believer in healthy living, exercise, good food, helping others, and mind-over-matter. That works for him, but different people deal with ageing differently. Some resort to cosmetics, cosmetic surgery or botox to make them feel and look younger. Others prefer the more natural approach. They start a new sport, become involved in philanthropic organisations, take up an organic lifestyle, practice meditation, take up yoga or increase their exercise whatever that may be. Still, what works for someone else might also work for you, so we asked readers and specialists what they think.

5 SIMPLE BEAUTY TIPS

  1. Load skin with antioxidants, using good products to fight wrinkles.
  2. Target the eye area. The skin around your eyes is thinner and more delicate so give the eye area some extra attention every day.
  3. Protect against sun damage by applying sun protection cream and wearing sunglasses.
  4. Exfoliate and cleanse your skin regularly.
  5. Prevent hair loss.

A WORD ON STYLE AND GROOMING

Francesca Scerri Rizzo, an aesthetician, says “When addressing ageing, we should really be tackling what it is that leads to ageing skin. Primarily it is the sun’s rays that we should be protecting ourselves from. It is very important to use a sunscreen that will prevent pigmentation and uneven skin tone. We also need to follow a healthy diet, to keep hydrated and to exercise regularly.” As a holistic therapist, Ms Scerri Rizzo says she is a firm believer in remaining as stress-free as possible: “Taking time to care for oneself, getting enough sleep and always finding something happy to smile about.”

Caroline Paris, a fashion stylist says as a stylist her main focus is the final look rather than whether certain clothes are age appropriate or not. “It’s more about the style than the actual clothes. The same pair of jeans can be styled to look great on both a 20-year old and a 40-year old depending on what else it is paired with,” she says.
As we mature, she says one should give less importance to having lots of clothes and trendy items and focus more on buying what she calls ‘investment pieces’: “The idea is to invest in a few key pieces of high quality that will last for many years and that can be adapted to be worn with many different outfits.”

 

EATING FOR HEALTHY HAIR

Thinning hair is one of the signs of ageing. Prolong hair health by eating right.

OMEGA 3 fatty acids reach both the hair shaft and the cell membranes in the scalp. Omega 3 fatty acids nourish the follicles and promote healthy hair growth. Eat flaxseeds, walnuts, salmon, tuna, kale, Brussels sprouts, and rapeseed oil.

Make sure you get enough ZINC. It boosts tissue growth and repair, helping your scalp and hair stay healthy. It also regulates hormones – including testoserone – and helps maintain production of oil-secreting glands on the scalp that help your hair grow. Eat chickpeas, wheat germ, oysters, beef, veal liver, and roast beef.

Eat a diet rich in HIGH QUALITY, NATURAL PROTEIN. The foods to eat: Greek yogurt, eggs yolks, kale, peanuts, beans, peas, lentils, tofu, chicken and turkey.

Make sure you eat foods that are rich in IRON for healthy blood, which helps deliver oxygen to the body’s cells. A lack of iron will result in your blood not being able to carry enough oxygen to your scalp for good hair growth. Eat dark leafy vegetables, whole grains, beans, red meat, turkey, egg yolks, clams, mussels, and oysters.

VITAMINS A and C contribute to the production of sebum, the oily substance that protects your hair naturally. Foods to eat: Swiss chard, spinach, broccoli, sweet potatoes and pumpkin.

Magnesium is also needed for good hair growth. Foods to eat: almonds, spinach, cashews, lentils, brown rice and halibut. Selenium helps stimulate hair follicles to encourage new hair growth. Foods to eat include: almonds, spinach, cashews, lentils, brown rice and halibut.

READERS ON WHAT KEEPS THEM FEELING YOUNG
“Dynamism n lifestyle and career, consistency in personal relationships.”
“Constant personal development and humour.”
“Playfulness and a relaxed attitude towards life. Letting my inner child out often helps to keepme feeling young. I don’t think we really ever grow up.We just grow old, so our inner attitude and perspective are key.”
“Love and positiveness.”
“A good laugh, contentment and happiness.”
“Living on the edge and listening to some great music.”
“Meditation, limited sun exposure UV damage, hydration, good skin care routine and supplements, avoidance of alcohol, tobacco and other toxins.”
“Keeping a smile on your face.”
“Adventure, regular exercise and affection. Sometimes affection is overlooked.We all need it”
“Drinking as much water as possible. Limited processed foods. Eating raw vegetables. Laughter and a commitment
to exercising your mind.”
“Drinking two litres of water a day.”
“In my case, having two babies at age 40 makes me feel very young.”
“A smoke-free body.”
“Being grateful for everything you have.”
“Avoiding stress, if possible.”
“Exercise.”
“Money.”
“A healthy sexual relationship.”
“Hope.”
“Wearing jeans, cool t-shirts and a smile that joins both ears.”
“Dance as often as possible. Help others. Think positive. Love fully. Pray. Laugh, laugh, laugh. Learn lessons quickly instead of making the same mistakes over and over again.”


Daniela Allen is a freelance journalist & PR consultant with a main interest in health. She has been involved in the print media for many years. As a journalist she reported on various matters, European bodies as well as the World Health Organization. Daniela has also collaborated closely with foreign media agencies including the BBC, where she co-worked on documentaries and other stories for both the BBC World Service and BBC Radio among others. Her passion involves expertise in bringing together networks of people. Daniela is committed towards raising awareness on health and other matters both through her writing as well as through events She may be contacted at Email: dallen@narrativestructures.com

About Dr Antonella Grima


Dr. Antonella Grima M.D. M.Sc. Pg.Dip. is the founder of the Health and Nutrition Centre in Luqa, Malta. She is a Medical Doctor specialised in Public Health as well as a Registered Nutritionist. Read More >

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